Ed Pearlman

Music Is Not Alone!

December 16th, 2014 by

My friend Mary was cornered by a 4th grade student one day, who told her, “You’re pretty smart, for a music teacher.”

Mary asked the little girl why she thought most music teachers weren’t so smart.

“Because you only teach singing and playing instruments.  Can you multiply?  Can you divide?  Can you do fractions?”

How would you answer this little girl?

Does this tell us something about our compartmentalized world?  The little girl was learning music but should she have been  taught the connections music has with everything else?

Should music teachers make these connections obvious?  Or are we so intent on making music fun and doable, or on accomplishing specific tasks involved in learning a skill or satisfying a curriculum, that we don’t have time or mental space to tie things together as we teach?

I find that making connections in music learning to people’s work lives, to school subjects, to decisionmaking, to learning, help people learn music better.  But I can’t say I methodically connect all the dots.  Do you?

Below are some connections meant as food for thought for music teachers.  (And please, add any subjects or angles that you feel are missing!) Read more…

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Posted in Music & Technology, Professional Development, Teaching Tips

The UK composer Elena Cobb has been busy recently!

Hot off the press is her latest book for complete beginner pianists entitled “My Piano Trip to London.”

London Calling!

Printed in full colour landscape, the first thing you notice is a sticker page that children will love using when they complete each song.

Each of the 17 songs represents a different London landmark or icon, giving a nice opportunity to engage the pupil in conversation outside music and then to relate it back to the lesson at hand. It’s quite an adventure to embark on with the pupil as you work your way through the book, from the Royal Albert Hall, to the London Eye, the Tower of London, Buckingham Palace and Big Ben to mention but a few.

Presentation

Over the years I’ve seen piano methods that contain lots of detailed instructions and exhaustive advice that quite frankly nobody bothers to read. Elena Cobb has really struck the balance I think in keeping each page clean and simple so that the teacher can do their job but also providing concise facts and tips that will be useful and enjoyable. I laughed to myself when reading Read more…

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Posted in Music Theory, Practicing, Product Reviews, Professional Development, Teaching Tips

It will be hard to outdo the Christmas gift given to my student families last year. The savvy keepsake came to me when I saw that it was possible to link a video to a QR code and print the codes on stickers.

FYI: A QR code (short for Quick Response) is a specific matrix bar code (or two-dimensional code), readable by dedicated QR bar code readers and camera phones. The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on a white background. The information encoded on a QR code can be text, a URL link or other data like a video.

I bribe my students with Music Money. (Read more about it here.) They are given the chance to shop and spend their hard-earned cash various times during the year at my studio store and as a result, they accumulate many trinkets and gifts.  Because of this bribery system, it seemed appropriate to give the parents of my students a gift instead for the holiday season. A handmade item crafted by their adored, budding musician seemed appropriate and definitely more meaningful than any store-bought item. This line of thought triggered the idea of students designing cards with QR code stickers for their parents. more

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Posted in Music & Technology, Performing, Teaching Tips

Robin Steinweg

Prepare to Perform

November 28th, 2014 by

By Robin Steinweg

With a recital looming on the horizon, some of my students asked how they could prepare to perform before an audience. So I made it the subject of a master class.

Snacks came first—the best-ever ice breaker. I found out some of their favorite cookies ahead of time, and did a little baking. It’s surprising how food warms the student heart and softens the attitude.  Apple cider and some new flavors of candy corn brought a fall flavor to the table. Some gourds for décor, and we were all set.

I got out my white board and asked the group a few questions about how they would prepare to perform. They recorded their answers on the board in their favorite colors. Let me share some of them. It’s not an exhaustive list, but it’s this group’s list, and I applauded them for it:

 WHY perform for an audience?

It’s fun

Gives others pleasure

Gives you experience and confidence

Lets you share something you love with others

You can show off how hard you’ve been working

Things to do to prepare to perform: Read more…

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Posted in Performing, Practicing, Teaching Tips

Sandy Lundberg

Teaching Arm Weight

November 26th, 2014 by

Keeping the arm behind each finger is a concept that should be taught early on in the piano teaching process. Here are some of the steps I use to help the students understand what I am asking of them.

  1. I start by asking the students to stand up tall; like a dancer, or a graceful tree.
  2. Then I have them try to feel their shoulders in different positions; way back, curled forward, hunched up toward their ears. The final position is the arms handing freely from the sockets, with shoulders relaxed and open-feeling. I also have them try breathing in each position and notice how much easier it is to breathe standing tall.
  3. To reinforce the relaxation of the shoulders I have them bend slightly forward from the waist and let their arms sway freely. I try to give them an image, such as wet spaghetti noodles, or willow tree branches—anything limp.
  4. Next they turn their palms down and lift their forearms a 90º angle and try to keep the relaxed feeling in their shoulders.
  5. Now we move to the piano and I talk to them about three firm joints and three relaxed joints. The three firm joints are in the fingers. The three relaxed joints are the shoulder, elbow, and wrist (the wrist being more “flexible” than loose).
  6. To get the feeling of strong fingers under a heavy relaxed arm, we practice holding a pencil with the eraser-end down, and dropping it onto a table or closed piano keyboard cover. When this feeling is mastered we move to dropping it on to the actual piano keys. Playing with a pencil may be a very crude approach to touch, but I would argue that it is a good beginning point with young students because it is so difficult for them to execute the feeling of a relaxed arm and strong finger joints at the same time.
  7. I have a “trick” pencil that is bendable, so at this point I bring it out and point out that we can’t make the same nice sound at the piano when the pencil collapses, and it is the same with our fingers.
  8. Now we look at the three finger joints and talk about how they should be shaped and held, and how they need to feel strong for holding up a heavy arm. At some point in here we also talk about the strong arch needed in the hand shape, formed by a concave palm.
  9. We work on strengthening the finger joints, preparing them to feel the weight of the arm, by making circles with the thumb, pressing each finger on an eraser tip, making “dog houses” on a flat surface, etc.
  10.  I have found that playing with just the third finger for awhile gives the student a chance to succeed and internalize this feeling. I then branch out to the second and fourth fingers, and finally the fifth finger and thumb—which need their own special lessons. Working with just one finger at a time also seems to help the student play with the non-playing fingers more relaxed, instead of sticking out all over the place.
  11.  I ask students to play non-legato until they master arm weight. Later, when we start legato playing, I go slowly and teaching them that the “walking arm” is still behind each finger.
  12.  Another tool I use is five-finger rhythms that have the student get a lot of height between notes so they can have the feeling of falling down on to the keys. It is hard to feel the weight of gravity if you are only a half inch over the landing.
  13.  Students might start to add an extra “push” behind the arm weight which results in a harsh sound. It can help to have them play the finger in the palm of their hand or on their own arm so they can “feel what the piano feels.”
  14.  When we get a firm foundation with the hand and fingers, I go back to work on the arm weight. I tell the students that each finger should feel like the arm “belongs to it” and is always right behind it. I use various tools to help them feel this weight, such as a length of fleece that creates a sling on their wrist. I work with them until I feel a completely relaxed arm as I hold up the sling. I also use girls’ hairbands on the wrist for this exercise. Having the students drop their arms freely onto their lap can help to regain the feeling of looseness during a lesson.
  15.  I point out to the student the better tonal quality they produce when their technique is good. I ask them to listen for the differences and describe them to me. Good technique can make your fourth grade song sound like you are a professional, and bad technique can make it sound like you are still in kindergarten.
  16.  In the beginning I go through all or part of this sequence every week until I feel like it is engrained in their muscle memory. After that I only make small corrections as needed during a lesson.
  17.  I have much better success with this process if the student has had no previous piano experience and there is no unlearning to do. To be honest, unless an older student makes a conscious decision to make the requested changes, you can have years of less-than-ideal results.
  18.  It is good to give students exercises to practice these skills that are played by ear, so there is no distraction of a printed page taking their focus off of the physical experience.
  19. Finally, I visit the student’s home once a year to see if they have proper sitting posture at home. After all, this is where most of their time at the piano is spent, and habits are ingrained. I often have to ask the parents to get booster cushions, and sometimes a footstool, to get the right position. This website has the best cushions at the best price: http://www.young-musicians.com/product-p/psc1.htm. They also sell reasonably priced footstools.

I realize there are many ways to teach the concept of arm weight, and much more detail that could be covered, but this is just an overview of how I approach the subject. I would love to hear back from you with more ideas so we can all keep improving.

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Posted in Practicing, Teaching Tips

Playing a musical alphabet game is a great way to reinforce the concept of reading music. Younger piano students also love to do any activities ‘off the piano bench’, don’t they?

Alphabet Game for Piano

Teaching the Musical Alphabet 

One of my favourite piano games helps my beginner students to learn the musical alphabet using a set of foam letter blocks.

I encourage them to trace over the letters, put the letter blocks in the correct order, place them one at a time on the piano keys (having picked them randomly from my bag) octave by octave – students see how the letters can be read backwards through the alphabet.  These are only a few of the ideas that could be used.

Read more…

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Posted in Music Theory, Practicing, Teaching Tips

Reuben Vincent

5 Reasons to Sing!

November 6th, 2014 by

And there I stood! A shy, male, British teenager!

Everything was conspiring against me. Especially my music teacher. Right then as he commanded me to “sing”, I was thinking unspeakable thoughts of hatred towards him.

Why did I need to sing in the school choir? After all I was an instrumentalist. I’d managed to survive all these years of mumbling at the back during class singing so why did everything need to get so ugly?

And there I stood! The whole choir of immature boys and girls just waiting to poke fun at me. Why couldn’t I just run around the corridors naked? Surely that would be less embarrassing?

But he made me do it! Oh how I seethed with anger at the time. But when I look back now, he probably gave me one of the greatest gifts to my musicianship!

So why sing?

Reason 1: Helps You Express Yourself Better
When you can’t articulate into words what you mean to another musician, singing simply fills in the gaps. The more frequently you sing to express musical ideas, the more relaxed and “normal” this method becomes. I love to promote a safe environment in my studio where everyone feels relaxed enough to communicate through singing their musical intentions without Read more…

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Posted in Composing & Arranging, Music & Technology, Performing, Practicing, Teaching Tips

With this post, I’m going to start a short series of blogs on the theme ‘An Invitation to Performance’. I will be exploring performance as an action, a skill, and as something that every teacher should consider offering as an integral part of his or her teaching studio. As my students and colleagues well know, I can get quite evangelical about the importance of providing access to performance – in particular experimental performance (about which more later) — to all students, whether aspiring professionals or dedicated amateurs.

Performance offers us commentary on and access to a part of our musical self that no other medium can: it is the window into our true, communicative, musical responses, while at the same time being in the only venue in which we can observe or consider those truths. Performance is a lot of other things as well, things that my friends well know that I take great pleasure in discussing far into the wee hours. It’s a space; it’s a shared arena for action; it’s the special place where only musical things happen; it’s our only access to the creativity of our audiences.

I’ll be saying more about these and other ideas surrounding performance in future blogs, but for now, let me me start the series by banging a favourite drum regarding an effective practical option available to all music teachers who wish to give their students more access to the joys and intrigue of performance: the institution of the studio masterclass.

Making masterclasses work

There can be few experiences more stimulating for both music teacher and student than witnessing an expert performer working with a student in a masterclass setting. Once the hard graft of technique, musicianship, and style have been addressed, and once the many long hours of practice have been clocked, the opportunity for students to step out into the light of the concert hall and begin to experiment with performance under the expert guidance of a professional is an invaluable one. It is the crucial step between practice and performance, in particular, professional performance – in my opinion, the crucial step.

And yet, not all teachers make the space for masterclasses as part of the regular studio activities. Read more…

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Posted in Performing, Practicing, Professional Development, Promoting Your Studio, Teaching Tips

“Students at any age will be encouraged to develop independence at the piano so that music can

be enjoyed on the bench for a lifetime.”

 The quote above is my longstanding mission statementGrowing “lifetime” pianists calls for meticulous planning, appealing music with a dose of  quality teaching and most importantly, an installation of strong technical skills and diligent practice habits. While reading the TeachPianoToday blog…. I was inspired by a post about a special welcome bag given to each new student. I thought this would be a great way to kick off fall lessons in my studio but instead give every student a “welcome-back bag”.  The idea of these bags becoming “practice pouches” made sense as practice is a habit that can always use a boost, especially after a summer break. Read more…

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Posted in Practicing, Teaching Tips

One of the biggest challenges students face when playing guitar is learning how to strum correctly.  They usually have a favorite song they’d love to learn how to play but when they sit down to try and figure it out it just doesn’t sound right.  Every time they try it, the strum sounds all herky-jerky instead of smooth and flowing.  Sound familiar?

Before we get started, be sure to open this PDF: Keys To Strumming, which I’ll be referring to throughout this post.  If you’re wondering what chords to play during this lesson, click here to use any to use any of the common-tone chord shapes I wrote about.

THE QUARTER NOTE BOUNCE

It’s fairly easy to teach a student how to play the quarter-note strumming pattern in Fig. 1 (Keys To Strumming PDF).  All you have to do is play a down-strum on every count (or beat). Every time you strum down, you count 1, 2, 3, 4, and so on.  But there’s really more going on here.  Once the down-strum is played, you have to lift your hand back up to prepare for the next down-strum, right?  This down-up movement of the strumming hand is more accurately represented by eighth notes.  Look at Fig. 1 again.  The arrows above the staff, hovering over each down beat and up beat, represent those eighth notes.  In other words, you should be counting “one and two and three and four and” as you strum down, up, down, up, etc.  This steady down-up strumming movement is what I call The Quarter Note Bounce. Read more…

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Posted in Music Theory, Performing, Practicing, Teaching Tips