Anna at CSU Outdoor PianoHere are some ideas to move your studio forward this summer:

Hold a sight-reading challenge. Set out good sight-reading books from your library for students to choose from each week. Give out prizes at the end of summer for reading a certain number of pages.

Host a summer camp. You could hold your camp one day a week for a month, or four to five days in one week. It could be to attract new students, or a fun intensive for current students. I like “Way Cool Keyboarding” books by Musical Moments for great ensemble playing with beginners.

Attend a concert and invite your students. Give your students “points” in the fall for each concert they attend over the summer. Email notices of upcoming events in your area, especially free events for kids. There will be a free “Peter and the Wolf” performance in my local park in a few weeks, so I sent a flier out to all my families.

Get out all the fun music. Take a break from your regular repertoire and find something different and exciting to learn this summer.

Prepare for fall competitions. This is the time to polish up pieces that need to be ready to go in October or November. For ideas, see my blog on “Preparing for an Event or Competition.”

Organize your music and files. Check for overdue borrowed books. Label and file new music. Enter new music into your Music Teacher’s Helper library. I use cardboard magazine boxes on my bookshelves to organize my music into labeled categories, so that I can find books quickly.

Order a new computer or iPad game.  Learn to use it yourself this summer so you can use it in your media lab this fall. Check out “The iPad Piano Studio” by Leila Viss.

Attend a workshop or seminar. Local colleges or music stores often host guest artists or speakers. Consider traveling a little to immerse yourself in a blues workshop, or an improvisation seminar.

Recruit new students. This is the time of year parents are looking for a music teacher to begin lessons in the fall. Make sure you are on top of your marketing strategies. For marketing ideas check out my blog on “How Do You Attract New Students?”

Try out Music Teacher’s Helper. If you don’t already use this fabulous tool, summer would be a great time to learn all it can do for your studio and your sanity!

Plan your studio budget. I swear I only make $.03 per hour after you take into consideration all the time I spend outside of lessons, and the number of “toys” it takes to keep me having fun teaching. But seriously, summer is a great time to plan for the money aspect of the next school year. List your projected expenses, and then calculate how many students you need, and what you need to charge for lessons this coming year.

Think through individual student needs. Summer is a great time to ponder each student, make a list of their personal strengths and weaknesses, and how you can best move them forward.

Decide on your “theme” for the coming year. My students are on a mission to find out what our theme will be for next year! Read my blog on “Themes Add Focus to Your Teaching” for more about how this can enhance your school year.

Look into Michelle Sisler’s games and motivational tools. Michelle is so creative! Every year she comes out with more and better ideas. Check them out at http://keystoimagination.com.

Get your instrument tuned and repaired. If you have been putting off this task, now is the time to get everything in tip top condition.

Learn new music. You could read through new music for ideas for your students, or brush up on some higher level pieces you will be assigning. You could also spend more time on your own musical repertoire.

Read a book. I am enjoying the book “Make it Stick” by Peter C. Brown, recommended on this blog site. If you can’t attend a seminar, a book is an inexpensive way to update and expand your thinking on a particular subject.

Get healthy. I’m serious. It is the only way you are going to live through next winter and withstand all the germs that are going to be traveling through your studio. Summer is a great time to make changes in your health habits.

Rest and refresh your spirit. Summer is a great time to take time for you! Do something you love but never get time for. Get outdoors, take a mini vacation, enjoy your kids and family, or just sit and enjoy the beautiful sunshine and be grateful for all you have been given.

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Posted in Music & Technology, Professional Development, Promoting Your Studio, Studio Management, Teaching Tips, Using Music Teacher's Helper

General bookkeeping tools that operate as one size fit all for any industry can sometimes fall short. Here are three reasons scheduling and billing softwares made specifically for private lesson music studios are advantageous over generic accounting tools and spreadsheets:

1) Specialization: 

The financial features within Music Teacher’s Helper have all the proper terminology for a music lesson studio. That decreases the learning curve. QuickBooks and FreshBooks can make you feel like you need an accountingshutterstock_63218473 degree in order use properly.

Music Teacher’s Helper also makes family-based billing and adding recital or book fees easy.

Student facing invoicing features provide a professional touch for your studio. Students or their parents can receive custom invoices, text message payment confirmations, all with your branding and music lesson terminology.

2) Simplified Reporting:

For a teaching studio with just one teacher, a full fledged suite of financial reporting is generally not necessary. For most, a music studio needs to track income and expenses, how much students owe, mileage, and student account summary.

3) Support From Knowledgable Peers:

With 24/7 email, chat and weekday phone support, Music Teacher’s Helper users have access to excellent support staff – many of them private music teachers and experienced users that understand a studio’s needs.

Industry specific softwares tend to understand the needs of their users better than generic financial tools. In addition, these softwares (like Music Teacher’s Helper) come with scheduling, website, and many others features.

Click Here For Main Website &  30-day Free Trial.

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Posted in Financial Business, Studio Management, Using Music Teacher's Helper

How often to do you evaluate the value of something verse the cost of something?

A Quick Story

Back in 2006, I paid $100 for a pair of Johnston & Murphy black leather dress shoes. Johnston & Murphy has a reputation for excellent craftsmanship and durability. This was one of the most expensive pairs for sale at Macy’s that day. Being in college at the time, I normally would grab the least expensive pair priced at $60 (I forget what brand). But I took a step back and thought about all the upcoming times I would be needing nice dress shoes – my brother’s wedding, my graduation, and future work. I wondered if that $60 pair was going to be the right shoe to wear for years to come. The Johnston & Murphy’s were more comfortable and felt higher-quality.

I asked an employee in the shoe department how many years each pair would last if worn consistently. He said the less expensive pair would last three years max and the Johnston & Murphy’s are known to be worn 10+ years by their owners.  That made my decision easy. Why would I choose to spend almost twice the amount of money, plus two additional shopping trips for a less comfortable shoe over a 10 year period?

Fast forward to 2014. I wear that same pair of shoes several times a week. They are starting to show their age after eight years but I consider them to still be in good condition. That fostered a new mindset for me about always considering the value of something on top of the cost.
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Posted in Professional Development, Studio Management, Using Music Teacher's Helper

It is that time again – studio recitals, last lessons of the semester, and the beginning of summer!

If you have not already done so, now is the perfect time to update your studio policy. (I sure hope if you are reading this, that you already have a studio policy!)

This year, I have been ultra efficient in this matter, and have already updated mine! I took a lot of time to consider/reconsider the following:

image1. Registration fee – I have been charging a registration fee for the last five years.

2. Tuition – I increase my tuition every year.

3. Sibling discount – I know many teachers frown upon this, but I do offer a small sibling discount.

4. Studio Scholarship – I offer a small award (in the form of reduced monthly tuition) for students that work hard and score highly in festivals and competitions.

imageI also finally decided to put my foot down about the following:

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Posted in Studio Management

Hopefully you will never have to ponder this heartbreaking question. Thankfully, most issues can be resolved with better communication and clear boundaries. It usually takes a lot of misbehavior to even consider dismissing a student, but even small things can add up to a big headache and energy drain over time. The following situations are always a challenge:

  • Student does not show up for lessons or is consistently late.
  • Frequent cancellations, especially at the last minute.
  • Unworkable sports schedule conflicts.
  • Parents pay late or not at all.
  • Student has a disrespectful attitude.
  • Student does not practice. Ever.
  • Student is not willing to try. Doesn’t want to be there.
  • Student frequently forgets to bring her books.
  • Parents do not offer encouragement and support at home.
  • Parents do not provide an adequate instrument on which to practice.
  • Student never participates in studio activities.
  • Student does not care for or return borrowed materials.
  • Student does not listen to direction, and refuses to attempt new ways of doing things.
  • You cannot seem to find the right pathway into a student’s brain to get him to learn and remember certain skills from week to week.
  • The parents’ expectations are miles apart from your reality.
  • Parent offers continual criticism.

When does the time come to say goodbye? Ultimately only you can answer that question within in the context of the particular situation, but here are some things you might want to ask yourself before “firing” a student. Read more…

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Posted in Professional Development, Studio Management, Teaching Tips

Does your studio have more students than you can handle, or do you wonder if anyone even takes music lessons any more? Why do some people seem to attract more students than they need and others struggle to fill their time blocks?

This is a complicated question, with many variables.

First and foremost people are attracted to what is attractive, valuable, and somewhat hard to get. Even when you need students, you can’t appear needy. So the first thing you must consider when attracting new students is what you have to offer. What makes you unique and valuable? Get busy being the kind of teacher, with the kind of studio, that people would stand in line to get in to.

With that in mind, there is one source of new students that will out perform every other source. However, before I discuss that source, here are some general advertising ideas to get your studio on the radar. Remember to project a confident, positive attitude as you introduce yourself. Stay a little bit hard to get.

  • Leave business cards on local bulletin boards, with your hair dresser, the mail carrier, and anyone you do business with in your community.
  • Drop off business cards and fliers with local real estate agents.
  • Put fliers out in local neighborhoods, door to door when allowed. Go on a Saturday morning so you have a chance to actually meet some people.
  • Call the music teachers at your local schools and introduce yourself. Ask how you can be of help to them. Offer to accompany for some of their programs.
  • Join one of the online teacher referral websites, such as LessonRating.com.
  • Put up a flier at your church or community center.
  • Order a magnetic sign for the side or back of your car, giving your studio name and contact information.
  • If allowed, put up a sign in front of your home studio. I know a teacher who puts up a sandwich-board type sign on a busy corner near his home every Sunday afternoon for a few hours.
  • Join a local music teachers’ association and ask to be put on the list for referrals and to be listed on their website.
  • Pass out fliers or business cards at local children’s sporting events, or when parents are picking their children up from school.
  • Create a website and make sure your name comes up when people search for a teacher in your area. (This could be a whole separate article!)
  • Hold a summer camp for students who want to explore the piano.
  • Write a guest editorial on a musical topic for your local newspaper.
  • Set up a booth at a local fair or community-day activity.
  • Have an entry in the town parade and/or pass out fliers along the route.
  • Advertise in the program for a local school play.
  • Offer a free introductory workshop.
  • Give a local recital of your own music.
  • Offer preschool music or Kindermusic classes to get students ready for instrumental lessons.
  • Offer group classes for teens or adults.
  • Teach retired adults during school hours.

Finally, what is the far and away best source for students? Your current students, of course! Your students will naturally recommend you to their friends, but there are things you can do to encourage this. At the end of each school year I give out coupons for students to give to their friends for a free trial piano lesson. If they recommend a student who signs up full time, the current student also gets a free lesson. I also ask current parents to write a short paragraph of recommendation that I can post on my website. Basically, you want to make sure your current students and parents have referrals on their mind.

It can take months for momentum to build from your efforts, so don’t be discouraged and don’t quit advertising. Your efforts now are filling your studio six to twelve months from now. Even if you are currently full, you cannot stop promoting your studio.

Please comment on this article with ways you have found to attract students. I would love to hear your ideas!

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Posted in Press, Promoting Your Studio, Studio Management

Yiyi Ku

Recital Gift Ideas

April 22nd, 2014 by

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Personalized Graduation Bears I gave to my students last year

It is upon us once again! I am talking about studio recitals to celebrate the end of the school year. I normally do this in June. My fellow bloggers on Music Teachers Helper and I have talked about recital planing many times in the past.

 

There are many benefits for holding studio recitals – motivation for polishing repertoire, opportunity to gain performance experience, recognition of student achievements, studio promotion, and social gathering of friends and families of the students. It is a lot of work to organize a recital, but as many of you will agree, the end result is well worth the effort.

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In this post, I would like to talk about recital gifts. I give students a little something at the end of every recital. In the past I have given trophies, medals, pins, certificates, personalized Christmas ornaments, hand-embellished soft toys, and treat bags containing all sorts of goodies. I try not to repeat myself, so it is getting harder to come up with ideas! Read more…

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Posted in Promoting Your Studio, Studio Management

onlinenotesI’m trying an experiment in online teaching — live classes.  If you have tried these and would like to discuss them or have questions, by all means, leave your comments below!

Live classes are different from online private lessons.  Private lessons have their own differences from in-person lessons, but I’ve discussed this in another post, so I’ll focus here on online classes with multiple students.

If you consider doing this, here are 10 questions you’ll want to take into account as you make your plans.  I’ll also mention some ways I’m dealing with it.  I’m not saying my approach is necessarily best, or even that it’s what I’ll end up with, but let’s consider it a work in progress… read on for 10 questions to get your thoughts in gear — Read more…

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Posted in Music & Technology, Studio Management, Teaching Tips

The Blank Stare.

blank stareWe dread it, but we’ve all seen it: the face that tells you unequivocally that your students are lost and haven’t got a clue what is going on. This can happen suddenly, and sometimes in the most unexpected places. Picture this scenario:

My lesson or class has been rolling along smoothly, and I’ve felt encouraged by the odd head nodding, or some gentle smiles tentatively creasing passive faces. I’ve smiled myself, warming to my subject, and then I’ve taken the fatal step.
                ‘And that’s how we know that the composer is modulating!’, I swoon. ‘She’s been hinting for the last two systems with those occasional B-flats and now we know from this arpeggio followed by the cadence: we are in F-major!’. 
                My revelation is met with silence, which is not what I expected. A hand shoots up, breaking the still pool of now immobile faces. ‘Why is it F-major and not F-flat major?’.  
                What?!’ I think, and try not to frown.  ‘Can you explain what you mean?’, I say.
                ‘I thought you said those were the “flat keys”, so why isn’t it F-flat major?’.
                ‘Because F isn’t flat,’ I reply. 
                Faces go blank and a thick pause of unknowing oozes across the classroom. Heads drop and a faint voice cries into its sleeve, ‘I don’t get it!’ and (since this is the film version) all the desks start shrinking backwards away from the teacher and disappear into a black abyss at the back of the room….

“Unknown unknowns”

ha ha i don't get it tshirtIt would be my guess that every music teacher reading this will have experienced at least some version of this same scenario. It can happen with children, teenager, or adult students, and, although it looks like the moment of catastrophe was caused by what I’ve called ‘one fatal step’ instructionally speaking, of course, these scenarios represent a series of moments of unknowing coming to a head. The student who asked this question (and it is a real question asked me in a class just last year) must have experienced many moments in previous classes when he hadn’t understood what was going on but hadn’t said anything. At the same time, I will have been happily piling concept after concept on top of this student without realizing that he hadn’t understood what was going on.

How can it happen that we sometimes unwittingly leave our students behind? And is there anything we can do to help those students who find the theoretical side of music difficult, or are some people simply ‘more musical’ than the others, who will always at some point get left behind? Read more…

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Posted in Music Theory, Performing, Practicing, Studio Management, Teaching Tips

How often do you find yourself in need of a list of your students?I'm in treble image

One can keep a list on your computer, but remembering to update it as you get new students or students discontinue can be inconsistent.

The easiest way to come up with a list of your students is to use the export names option on MTH; such a seemingly simple option that can save you time and help you in emergency situations. Read more…

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Posted in Customer Support, Studio Management, Uncategorized, Using Music Teacher's Helper